This is where you have more than one connection and you balance the load across them.  The load balancer shares traffic across multiple internet connection.  Suppose you go to website A, you will get the speed of one connection.  Then you open website B, this will get the full speed of the second connection.  It never doubles your speed but allows more traffic to go through at the same speed. 

  • Load Balancing

This is where you have more than one connection and you balance the load across them.  The load balancer shares traffic across multiple internet connection.  Suppose you go to website A, you will get the speed of one connection.  Then you open website B, this will get the full speed of the second connection.  It never doubles your speed but allows more traffic to go through at the same speed. 

  • Bonding

This picks up where load balancing leaves off.  This will split all traffic between multiple internet connections.  It costs more than bonding because there needs to be a corresponding load-balancer in the cloud.  It will add together the bandwidth (speed) of multiple connections to give you a much faster connection than load balancing.

  • Failover

This is where you would have a primary internet connection, say a 100Mb leased line, but for reliability, you have a (usually slower, cheaper) secondary internet connection that will be used automatically if your primary internet connection fails.  This gives you continuity of service should the primary Internet connection fail. 

  • Active-Active Failover

This is failover with an extra benefit.  Having a secondary redundant Internet connection may seem like an investment with no tangible benefit.  You can however make use of the secondary connection for a different workload.  For example, if you have a 100Mbti Leased line for data and VOIP, with an 80/20 FTTP backup circuit, you might decide to use the backup circuit to back up the data on your servers at regular intervals during the day without affecting normal internet or telephone usage.  If the primary Internet connection were to fail, a rule would allow all data and VOIP to transfer to the secondary circuit with another rule that throttles backups and prioritises voice calls to ensure that your telephones work well while the primary circuit is down. 

  • Custom Configuration

There are many types of customer configurations, but a simple one to explain would be to tell your router to synchronise (connect) at a slightly slower speed than normal.  This would reduce line errors and prevent downtime.  This has been used successfully many times on slow ADSL circuits providing 1-2Mb/s.  Often these circuits are the best you can get in certain regions (usually down to long, poor quality cable-runs to the BT exchange) and lowering the speed by say 5% can make a line that has dropouts maybe 10 times per day more reliable and have maybe one dropout per 3 or 4 weeks.

  • Site to Site Connections (VPN)

Some businesses have all of their infrastructure and data in the cloud, but many do not.  In many cases, the cloud is not a viable option.  Businesses with more than one office or location may want to link these sites so that they can share servers and data.  This is a site to site link.  There are several ways to this such as VPN, MPLS etc, but the end result is that multiple sites can act and be accessed as if they are a single site. 

  • Building to Building Links

Generally, the most cost effective connection is a copper cable.  Copper has some cable-length limitations and often a cable-run between buildings may be too far for copper.  Then next option to consider would be fibre.  Fibre costs more and generally there would be construction work required such as digging a trench.  Although incredibly reliable, there are several reasons that fibre may be undesirable, especially if the buildings have a public road between them!  A wireless link is a great way to bridge the network between multiple buildings, or to provide connectivity to a portacabin or adjacent structure.  There are no construction charges associated with digging trenches.  There are usually no distance issues either.  This is a great way to quickly link buildings together with the minimum of disruption or permanent changes. 

  • Copper Cabling

Most networks use copper cabling capable of 1, 100 or 1000mb/s speeds. 1000mb otherwise known as 1Gb or gigabit is pretty much the norm these days. 10Gb is becoming popular for backbones and inter-server links. 

  • Fibre Optics or just ‘Fibre’

This is a glass based cable that transmits light rather than electricity.  The cost is higher than Copper, but so is the potential speed and distances achievable.  It is immune to electromagnetic interference from say machinery and it is much harder to intercept data, making it more secure in many circumstances.  Fibre is the go-to technology for longer distance connections where adequate line-of-sight is not available for radio links. 

  • ‘Cable’ 

Many areas are equipped to use Virgin Media’s cable Internet, offering incredible speeds at a low cost.  This technology can be easy to disrupt.  Extensions or modification to the cabling must be done correctly with the correct grade of cable, compression connectors, attenuators and know-how.  In some cases it is advisable to switch your router to ‘modem-mode’ and put a different device behind it.  We can advise on all of this. 

  • Radio or Wireless Links

There are several companies providing connectivity to your building without using long cables.  They do this using radio technology, much like receiving television signals.  They are generally only available in certain areas where the provider has a mast, but they can offer a fast connection where there are no other viable or affordable options. 

  • 4G/5G

This uses the mobile telephone networks to provide internet connections.  The speed can be very fast and in some places can be unreliable.  The speed you will experience is dependent upon how close you are to the radio mast and how much data is being used locally by other devices.  This is often used as a backup circuit or to supplement an existing connection through load balancing or bonding. 

  • Antennae Cabling

Often if you are using wireless solutions (wifi, radio or 4G/5G), you may want the device in on location such as a data cabinet and the antenna in a different location – such as on an external wall.  To do this you will need antenna cabling.  It is important to use the correct gain antennae and the correct grade of cabling with well terminated connectors, otherwise there is a good chance of things being unreliable or simply not working at all. 

  • Bespoke Solutions

There have been occasions where a property is listed in OpenReach’s database as not having the required connectivity, but where it is available for other addresses in the vicinity.  Most ISP’s simply look at OpenReach’s database and reject the order.  We have had some success in getting people connected even when OpenReach’s availability database says that a service is unavailable.